Bob Crow’s successor needs to find a gentler way

Arpana Gandhi reflects on the death of Bob Crow

IMG_6074_bwBob Crow’s death has no doubt sent shockwaves within the trade union movement.

It cannot be denied that  Crow was a formidable campaigner, who fought tirelessly, not only for his beliefs but also, on behalf of his members. The industrial disputes and campaigns, which led to a walkout by London Underground workers last month in a dispute over ticket office closures, certainly elevated his position as a strong leader amongst his members. He had achieved a personal ascendancy unmatched by any union leader.

He spoke at rallies and meetings most weekends, and was always in demand to support campaigns.

I appreciate that Bob Crow did what he was elected to do. However, social and economic justice can be achieved with dignity and respect, without the need for controversy.

To resolve any issue in consideration of the interests of all, such a solution can be implemented with dialogue, diplomacy and a mutually acceptable way.

I am not sure what Crow would have chosen as his epitaph?  Whatever his legacy, one can only hope his successor is someone who can campaign without militancy or disputes.  Perhaps drifting back to the centre of politics will garner favourable support from the public, which the newly elected RMT leader may wish to consider.

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Tags: Bob Crow RMT

2 Comments

  1. mr crow behaviour is part of an unfortunate tradition – i was privileged to feel the effect of ray buckton’s antics in the 1970′s

    it is both pointless and damaging

    trade union leaders and members probably know the intentions of management well ahead of the public brawling charade in which they readily engage

    would it help for management to publicise better detailed policies and their possible consequences?

    if tube workers wish to debate the issue (eg) of driverless trains they can find (and fund) their parliamentary political backers and we can begin the debate as to whether people should face the cost of economic damage of their actions

  2. ‘To resolve any issue in consideration of the interests of all, such a solution can be implemented with dialogue, diplomacy and a mutually acceptable way.’
    If only we’d had you at Kohima, Arpana!

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